Books that have stayed with me

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just ones that have touched you. @Mention the people you’ve seen with their own version of this post.

Mentioned: northstarfan

  1. Dungeons & Dragons Players’ Guide by Gary Gygax
  2. The Hobbit / The Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien
  3. Fantasy Craft Core Rulebook by Crafty Games
  4. Han Solo At Stars’ End by Brian Daley
  5. Savage Sword of Conan The Barbarian by Marvel Comics
  6. Doctor Who New Adventures: Transit by Ben Aaronovich
  7. Doctor Who in an Exciting Adventure with the Daleks by David Whitaker
  8. The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall
  9. Aeon / Trinity Core Rules by White Wolf Game Studios
  10. Dragon Flight by Anne McCaffrey

burntlikethesun:

allpossibleentendres:

anotherhobo:

apileofgoodthings:

#that awkward moment when a 48 year old scifi show has more continuity #than a 2 year old series about misfit high schoolers 

*ahem- 50 year old…

But also that awkward moment when the Forest of Cheem’s sacrifice is relegated to unimportance in Moffat’s world. Her bravery and kindness don’t matter, and she’s turned into yet another cheap joke about women being infatuated with the Doctor.

That she fancied the Doctor did not feature at all in the season 1 episode. She was curious about his origins, she had sympathy for him, and she gave her life so he could save the rest of the people aboard the base. I personally don’t see her fawning over him (like so many of Moffat’s women do). Thus, with no real evidence to draw this from, Moffat seems to be interpreting her sacrifice as “fancying” the Doctor, which is immensely problematic: It suggests that she did this only for him rather than to save everyone on the ship, and it shows yet another example of Moffat thinking that any woman who interacts with the Doctor must be infatuated with him.

Even if she did fancy him, the fact that Moffat considers her actions negligible in comparison to her “crush” is pretty gross, especially when the payoff from this line is so small. All it does in the context of the episode is set up the Doctor as an object of desire. But in the context of the show, it undermines the agency and power of women to act with bravery and integrity without it being all for the Doctor.

lmao i remember complaining about this exact same thing on this exact same gifset back in 2011

additionally THAT’S NOT EVEN HER NAME

her name was Jabe??? this is like saying ‘i met the human race once. they fancied me’

(Source: hellbigs, via ravennightshade)

slythgeek:

evillordzog:

would-you-like-a-jelly-baby:

blaixen:

(X)

Matt Smith could have been such a wonderful doctor… if Moffat hadn’t been writing the show.

woop there it is

I hate Moffat as much as anyone else, and most of this is spot on.

But…

The statement in gif #5 is problematic. Flirting and kissing isn’t in itself bad, and we’ve ample evidence that River indulges in similar behaviour (including, btw, the sort of behaviour mentioned in gif #3; remember the prison guard affected by her mind control lipstick, or her poisoning of the Doctor in the same manner? They are a deeply messed up pair). Nor does it mention that he flirts with men, even though we’re pretty much only ever told this after the fact. If you’re going to call out Moffat — queerbaiting jerk off that he is — and the Doctor, you shouldn’t indulge in erasure to do it. But the criticism overlooks the actual problem with the marriage: the Doctor manipulated River into it specifically to subvert her already deeply compromised personal agency to his own agenda,

I also have to call shenanigans on gif #6.

Even before we find out that the Silents are there to rewrite history as part of their bizarrely overcomplicated plan to kill the Doctor, we know that they’ve infiltrated every level of global infrastructure, enslaving the planet, driving some people insane AND casually murdering others — and that’s just directly. I’m pretty certain they also claimed responsibility for shaping humanity’s development to their own ends (however true or not that turned out to be) so they’re just inviting the Doctor to lay the blame for the deaths of tens if not hundreds of millions of people at their feet. Given their particular powerset, within the context of the story the Doctor did the best he could and gave humanity the tool it needed to free itself by hoisting the Silents on their own petard.

The Silents are not innocents, and they deserved everything they got.

Nor is it the first time that the Doctor has slaughtered an entire enemy army by using their own power against them. You can go as far back as the 2nd Doctor story ‘Seeds of Death’ where the Doctor sends the entire Martian invasion fleet — whose plan, don;t forget, was to ariesform Earth — on a one-way trip to the sun by sabotaging their guidance system.

The first Doctor seemingly killed off the entire Dalek race the first time he met them to save the Thals from armageddon. The 4th was given the job of preventing the Daleks from ever being created and messed it up. The 6th regretfully wiped out the genetically engineered progenitors of what was intended to be a slave species because they would have slain the whole of humanity if given half a chance. The 7th Doctor took his tilt at wiping out both the Daleks and the Cybermen when they tried using stolen Gallifreyan technology.

And even if you just keep to the new series, RTD intended that the Doctor before the 9th wiped out both the Daleks and the Gallifreyans (and I will never forgive Moffat for undoing that). Had half the Earth’s population not been in the firing line, I don’t doubt for a moment the 9th would have fried the Dalek fleet.

I am personally unhappy with the Silents thing because he is so very gleeful about it, and the story in no way makes it obvious he doesn’t think of killing them as anything more than a game. Eleven is flippant about a lot of things like that.

He thinks the solution is clever, and when Moffat Eleven thinks he’s being clever he wants EVERYONE to (a) know about, and (b) agree with him. Indeed, he makes that very point in this story. In some respects his childish hubris is even greater than Ten’s overweening arrogance (and is entirely diagnostic of Moffat’s problems as a writer, as a showrunner, and a showrunner who writes for the show).

But the Silents in that story were so one dimensionally evil and completely secure in their dominance I’m not in the least bit surprised at his attitude. Daleks have more depth of personality than what were less monster and for all intents and purposes nothing more than a plot device (that were even harder to understand than Tom Hardy as Bane). There was literally nothing to regret about their demise and for all the faults of the character and man writing him I just can’t bring myself to find fault with it.

And that really does fall squarely on Moffat’s shoulders, because Impossible Astronaut and Day of the Moon were complete and utter pants, a series of inconsistent set pieces strung together with buttfloss that barely hung together on a first viewing and continually make less and less sense as you look at them in context of the larger plot arc. All the Silence as a faction needed to do was quietly station someone on Trenzelore whose sole job would be to shoot the Doctor in the face the moment he showed up

(Source: to-killl-a-mocking-jay)

would-you-like-a-jelly-baby:

blaixen:

(X)

Matt Smith could have been such a wonderful doctor… if Moffat hadn’t been writing the show.

woop there it is

I hate Moffat as much as anyone else, and most of this is spot on.

But…

The statement in gif #5 is problematic. Flirting and kissing isn’t in itself bad, and we’ve ample evidence that River indulges in similar behaviour (including, btw, the sort of behaviour mentioned in gif #3; remember the prison guard affected by her mind control lipstick, or her poisoning of the Doctor in the same manner? They are a deeply messed up pair). Nor does it mention that he flirts with men, even though we’re pretty much only ever told this after the fact. If you’re going to call out Moffat — queerbaiting jerk off that he is — and the Doctor, you shouldn’t indulge in erasure to do it. But the criticism overlooks the actual problem with the marriage: the Doctor manipulated River into it specifically to subvert her already deeply compromised personal agency to his own agenda,

I also have to call shenanigans on gif #6.

Even before we find out that the Silents are there to rewrite history as part of their bizarrely overcomplicated plan to kill the Doctor, we know that they’ve infiltrated every level of global infrastructure, enslaving the planet, driving some people insane AND casually murdering others — and that’s just directly. I’m pretty certain they also claimed responsibility for shaping humanity’s development to their own ends (however true or not that turned out to be) so they’re just inviting the Doctor to lay the blame for the deaths of tens if not hundreds of millions of people at their feet. Given their particular powerset, within the context of the story the Doctor did the best he could and gave humanity the tool it needed to free itself by hoisting the Silents on their own petard.

The Silents are not innocents, and they deserved everything they got.

Nor is it the first time that the Doctor has slaughtered an entire enemy army by using their own power against them. You can go as far back as the 2nd Doctor story ‘Seeds of Death’ where the Doctor sends the entire Martian invasion fleet — whose plan, don;t forget, was to ariesform Earth — on a one-way trip to the sun by sabotaging their guidance system.

The first Doctor seemingly killed off the entire Dalek race the first time he met them to save the Thals from armageddon. The 4th was given the job of preventing the Daleks from ever being created and messed it up. The 6th regretfully wiped out the genetically engineered progenitors of what was intended to be a slave species because they would have slain the whole of humanity if given half a chance. The 7th Doctor took his tilt at wiping out both the Daleks and the Cybermen when they tried using stolen Gallifreyan technology.

And even if you just keep to the new series, RTD intended that the Doctor before the 9th wiped out both the Daleks and the Gallifreyans (and I will never forgive Moffat for undoing that). Had half the Earth’s population not been in the firing line, I don’t doubt for a moment the 9th would have fried the Dalek fleet.

(Source: to-killl-a-mocking-jay, via slythgeek)

Please enjoy this ridiculous collection of illustrations from the Doctor Who Cookbook

theheroheart:

Illustrations by Gail Bennett, 1985. I’m gonna do my favourites first cause THERE’S A LOT. Like, a good 80 ridiculous drawings of Doctors 1-6 and companions and enemies and whatnot.

And uhh… Probably… content warning for cannibalism? And a lot of disturbing things if you stop to think about it??

image

I had to start with this one cause SIX IS LITERALLY COOKING SOUP IN A CYBERMAN HEAD!!

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Read More

nudityandnerdery:

"I never know quite what to say about this. Because they’re both characters, and in my head they’re both people. My God, if that’s not sexualized, they’re not having a very good time, are they?" [x]

Oh, Moffat. If you think relationships need sexual tension to be entertaining, then that’s just sad and disappointing.

Can this man just go.

siryl:

Cover art by Peter Elson for the 1992 Doctor Who novel Nightshade by Mark Gatiss.
Fun fact: Mark Gatiss became a regular writer for the T.V. series once it returned from hiatus in 2005.

Equally fun fact: None of his TV work for Doctor Who has been as good as this book.

siryl:

Cover art by Peter Elson for the 1992 Doctor Who novel Nightshade by Mark Gatiss.

Fun fact: Mark Gatiss became a regular writer for the T.V. series once it returned from hiatus in 2005.

Equally fun fact: None of his TV work for Doctor Who has been as good as this book.

(Source: elcilantroo, via moonzerotwo)

doeandthestag:

I have this post saved in my drafts and I use for my reference, and I thought some other people might be interested.

Okay, these are just a few of the posts and articles which articulate some of my thoughts (and other Whovians thoughts) about the issues in Doctor Who since…

(via slythgeek)

"I did have some lines in about that," Steven begins, "but then I cut them, because I thought people just wouldn’t really be bothered about it. If asked by one of the writers, I say she has very dream-like images of it. Because Episode 1 is set in Victorian times, I did have a moment where I had her remembering stuff, and then I just ‘Oh this is too much, we don’t care,’ so I got rid of it."

Steven Moffat, in answer to the question of whether Clara remembers what happens in the Doctor’s timestream and whether she remembers all the lives she lived as other versions of herself (via teainthebluebox)

why would we care about the companion or how that massive supposedly-death-defying major event changed her amirite

(via burningupasun)

The more I read his quotes, the more I dislike him.

(via feigenbaumsworld)

Okay, this angers me, but I’m not finding any sources on the quote other than Tumblr, can anyone link to a source?

(via nudityandnerdery)

Comes from a DWM interview with the tosser

(via nudityandnerdery)

perpugilliam:

big-finish-sketches:

Okay everyone, we can do this!

wait, why would you need “The Wrong Doctors” and “Spaceport Fear”? “The Seeds of War” is the only one that has a connection to DE2.

perpugilliam:

big-finish-sketches:

Okay everyone, we can do this!

wait, why would you need “The Wrong Doctors” and “Spaceport Fear”? “The Seeds of War” is the only one that has a connection to DE2.