"Adric was the second Doctor Who regular to be killed by the Cybermen, the first being, of course, the First Doctor."

Matthew Waterhouse, Blue Box Boy

image

(via perpugilliam)

He’s not exactly wrong, though. Sure the Doctor would have pretty much keeled over regardless of what adventure came after The Smugglers, the Cybermen were still effectively the straw that did it.

evillordzog:

Not present: Mickey Smith as Maria Hill & Captain Jack Harkness as Agent Coulson
A little while ago I came across this image of a Doctor Who companions / The Avengers genderflip mashup 

and was struck by how — to me anyway — the creator got almost all of them wrong.
Clara/Captain America. This is the only point of agreement. Clara is the companion lost in time defending her great cause.
Amy/Director Fury. The eyepatch was an obvious starting off point for me whereas I suspect the original went for a colour match. Amy is very much large and in charge — remember who was running the war against the Silence in the paradox reality — routinely electing to ignore what she considers stupid-ass decisions.
Rose/Iron Man. Both characters are startingly self-centered when we first meet them but undergo a process of change that opens their eyes to a wider world of other people. They still think they’re the bee’s knees, though.
Martha/Hawkeye. Consistantly underrated against their more popular compatriots, and put through absolute hell by the big bad, yet when they bring their A-game they can wipe the floor with the best of them.
Rory/Black Widow. Gods and monsters think they have the measure of these two yet they’ll do the impossible to safeguard the ones they care about.
River/The Hulk. Good people turned into terrible monsters who ultimately learn to embrace that darkness for the greater good.
Donna/Thor. They both get angry, but their definining quality is a self-righteous nature that learns humility and the service of others. They achieve great nobility but have a great and inevitable doom held over them.
Mickey/Agent Hill. The retainer (some would say the Tin Dog) who seems set up to fail only to reveal hidden depths.
Jack/Agent Coulson. The man who won’t die. While not a genderflip, I think his pansexuality kinda squeaks him through.

evillordzog:

Not present: Mickey Smith as Maria Hill & Captain Jack Harkness as Agent Coulson

A little while ago I came across this image of a Doctor Who companions / The Avengers genderflip mashup 

and was struck by how — to me anyway — the creator got almost all of them wrong.

Clara/Captain America. This is the only point of agreement. Clara is the companion lost in time defending her great cause.

Amy/Director Fury. The eyepatch was an obvious starting off point for me whereas I suspect the original went for a colour match. Amy is very much large and in charge — remember who was running the war against the Silence in the paradox reality — routinely electing to ignore what she considers stupid-ass decisions.

Rose/Iron Man. Both characters are startingly self-centered when we first meet them but undergo a process of change that opens their eyes to a wider world of other people. They still think they’re the bee’s knees, though.

Martha/Hawkeye. Consistantly underrated against their more popular compatriots, and put through absolute hell by the big bad, yet when they bring their A-game they can wipe the floor with the best of them.

Rory/Black Widow. Gods and monsters think they have the measure of these two yet they’ll do the impossible to safeguard the ones they care about.

River/The Hulk. Good people turned into terrible monsters who ultimately learn to embrace that darkness for the greater good.

Donna/Thor. They both get angry, but their definining quality is a self-righteous nature that learns humility and the service of others. They achieve great nobility but have a great and inevitable doom held over them.

Mickey/Agent Hill. The retainer (some would say the Tin Dog) who seems set up to fail only to reveal hidden depths.

Jack/Agent Coulson. The man who won’t die. While not a genderflip, I think his pansexuality kinda squeaks him through.

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

(via captain-jaybird)

Ogri, chilling out between takes for Doctor Who season 8?

Ogri, chilling out between takes for Doctor Who season 8?

(Source: riotclitshave)

(Source: tonysttark, via lulubonanza)

silvanoir said: Do I want Moffat involved? no. God no. Do I want the series made? YES. Big yes.

And thus stands the great problem otherwise known as “This is why we can’t have nice things”. Because the people in charge are the very same people who will fuck it up so bad that having it from them is likely worse than not having it at all.

For me at least given the best case scenario is that it’s inevitably going to have be remediated via fanon, I’d rather just cut out the pain and go straight to that.

*sigh*

silvanoir:

lumos5001:

riverknowshisname:

foreverwholocked:

#I will always wonder what happened to Jenny

still wonder what happened to Jenny

Twelve needs to run into Jenny

People keep asking for a female Doctor Who… and she was literally the daughter of the doctor.  And only got one episode.  The could have built a whole series around her.  Or at least a mini-series.  Why didn’t they?

Is that really a series you want Moffat to have any involvement with?

(Source: riverttam)

Since Steven Moffat took over as Doctor Who showrunner in 2009, he has never hired a single female writer. Only once has he brought on a female director, back in season five. Needless to say, this track record only adds fuel to the ever-growing number of fans who say Moffat is taking Doctor Who in a more conservative and sexist direction.

Historically, Doctor Who has been a socially progressive show. That’s surely why so many viewers have singled out Steven Moffat for hiring such a vast number of white, male writers while female characters kept turning into flirty sidekicks and the number of non-white characters plummeted. The most popular explanation is that the vast majority of British science fiction TV writers are white men, and only the cream of that crop can be hired to work for the BBC’s flagship show.

This explanation doesn’t hold up when you consider the number of unavoidably bad episodes that were written by the show’s existing (male) writers. And besides, other successful British sci-fi/fantasy shows like Being Human, Torchwood and Merlin have all hired women to write multiple episodes in the past, and that never seemed to do them any harm.

[READ MORE]

(Source: hellotailor, via nudityandnerdery)

Books that have stayed with me

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just ones that have touched you. @Mention the people you’ve seen with their own version of this post.

Mentioned: northstarfan

  1. Dungeons & Dragons Players’ Guide by Gary Gygax
  2. The Hobbit / The Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien
  3. Fantasy Craft Core Rulebook by Crafty Games
  4. Han Solo At Stars’ End by Brian Daley
  5. Savage Sword of Conan The Barbarian by Marvel Comics
  6. Doctor Who New Adventures: Transit by Ben Aaronovich
  7. Doctor Who in an Exciting Adventure with the Daleks by David Whitaker
  8. The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall
  9. Aeon / Trinity Core Rules by White Wolf Game Studios
  10. Dragon Flight by Anne McCaffrey

burntlikethesun:

allpossibleentendres:

anotherhobo:

apileofgoodthings:

#that awkward moment when a 48 year old scifi show has more continuity #than a 2 year old series about misfit high schoolers 

*ahem- 50 year old…

But also that awkward moment when the Forest of Cheem’s sacrifice is relegated to unimportance in Moffat’s world. Her bravery and kindness don’t matter, and she’s turned into yet another cheap joke about women being infatuated with the Doctor.

That she fancied the Doctor did not feature at all in the season 1 episode. She was curious about his origins, she had sympathy for him, and she gave her life so he could save the rest of the people aboard the base. I personally don’t see her fawning over him (like so many of Moffat’s women do). Thus, with no real evidence to draw this from, Moffat seems to be interpreting her sacrifice as “fancying” the Doctor, which is immensely problematic: It suggests that she did this only for him rather than to save everyone on the ship, and it shows yet another example of Moffat thinking that any woman who interacts with the Doctor must be infatuated with him.

Even if she did fancy him, the fact that Moffat considers her actions negligible in comparison to her “crush” is pretty gross, especially when the payoff from this line is so small. All it does in the context of the episode is set up the Doctor as an object of desire. But in the context of the show, it undermines the agency and power of women to act with bravery and integrity without it being all for the Doctor.

lmao i remember complaining about this exact same thing on this exact same gifset back in 2011

additionally THAT’S NOT EVEN HER NAME

her name was Jabe??? this is like saying ‘i met the human race once. they fancied me’

(Source: hellbigs, via ravennightshade)